mmmumph...

If any of my replies over the next few days are a bit grumpy, you'll know why.

This afternoon I had two teeth extracted. Quite traumatic. They were two back teeth, one had four roots. I've got a fairly small mouth, the dentist has big fat fingers, so he was muttering all the way through. My heart sank when I heard the "snap" -- both teeth broke when pulled, so he had to dig the roots out.

I've got prescriptions for antibiotics and painkiller. He said it will be a bit uncomfortable for a few days -- which may be an understatement, as the chemist told me the painkiller (Panadeine Forte) is extra strong.

How on earth am I supposed to eat anything? I have a bowl of rice and lentils sitting in front of me, not game to tackle it yet.

Posted on 25 Aug 2008, 17:58


Comments:

Posted on 25 Aug 2008, 18:16 by downsouth
sustagen
sustagen drink good when the wizzers came out - keeps you going till pain subsides enough to eat.



Posted on 25 Aug 2008, 20:00 by JustGreg
I feel for you
My wisdom teeth had to be cut out. Milk shakes and ice cream got me though. Both taste good and are cold to reduce swelling. More than enough calories to keep you going.


Posted on 25 Aug 2008, 20:30 by prehistoric1
been there
Good advice above. Don't even think about chewing until you know exactly what is going on in there. In my case, Ensure and Smoothies provided nutrition. Deadlines and schedules are out. Activity in the interim is to keep your mind occupied, accomplishment is secondary.

Try not to throttle anyone who takes this less seriously than you do.


Posted on 25 Aug 2008, 21:56 by Raffy
soup
Soup can bring the goodies in without chewing (in the case of rice). [There's even a county here where people use coffee as soup for rice - they use brewed coffee from their harvest.]

If the teeth were originally infected, the pain will go away only when the infection is gone, so make sure that the antibiotics are doing the job.


Posted on 25 Aug 2008, 22:24 by divisionmd
Whisky
A glas of whisky is a perfect cure for most things.



Posted on 25 Aug 2008, 23:26 by dogone
Extractions over time
I find it helpful to consider such experiences in a historical light. After all, the first dentists were blacksmiths. No one else had the tools or "expertise".

Did your dentist's office look anything like this?

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Australian_blacksmith.jpg


Posted on 25 Aug 2008, 23:33 by veronicathecow
Reducing Pain
Clove oil and computer games!
The clove oil can kill nerves though so beware.
Computer games (and for me DVD's) apparently reduce the level of percieved pain. See http://www.impactlab.com/2006/03/30/study-video-games-shown-to-reduce-pain/
Hope this helps, all the best
Tony


Posted on 25 Aug 2008, 24:35 by UnklAdm
My vote's for whiskey
Moderate doses of inexpensive blended Canadian whiskey always worked well for me.

Programming is not recommended while intoxicated, if you must, try to simplify the complex.

Software TESTING while intoxicated is encouraged. I've discovered many bugs this way.




Posted on 26 Aug 2008, 3:04 by lobster
pro-biotics
finish all the antibiotics
drink lassi - use yogurt or yakult (do you have that - pro-biotics) to replace good bugs in tum

keep taking pain killers - suffering effects the immune system - so don't do it.

Stimulate serotonin production (usually means physical activity)



Posted on 26 Aug 2008, 4:16 by LolaChico
panadeine forte
there's a quite a lot of codeine (an opiate) in these. I expect they will be effective but don't get too attached to them & PLEASE don't drink alcohol with them. Either whisky (if you drink, that is) OR opiate, never both together (risk of respiratory arrest)


Posted on 26 Aug 2008, 8:05 by BarryK
Cleocin
Thanks for the excellent advice! Yeah, one tooth was infected. If anyone reading this knows about antibiotics, you might be alarmed at what was prescribed to me: Brand name 'Cleocin', from Pfizer, contains 'clindamycin hydrochloride' -- and after a bit of online investigation, it looks like I will have to take extra care to restore the intestinal flora afterward.


Posted on 26 Aug 2008, 8:12 by WN2A
Dental Work
Barry,
Above all, make certain the antibiotics have done their job when you have finished using them. If any fever after you have used them up see the dentist or a doctor. Don't risk endocardia infection,etc!

WN2A


Posted on 26 Aug 2008, 10:17 by cthisbear
Salt water rinses
I would be gargling with warm to hot salty water;
as I would be worrying about dry sockets etc..
after such a problem extraction.

I use to drink Tomato juice after dental work,
if I was feeling iffy, and just wanted something to drink.
////////////////////////

http://askdrellie.blogspot.com/2008/04/tooth-extraction-failed-root-anal.html

" I suggest warm sea salt mouth rinses after the extraction to prevent infection and speed healing.
If you can't get to the store to buy the items I suggest - just use the warm salt rinse - starting now. It does not taste great - but it will prepare your mouth for the extraction. "

Chris.


Posted on 26 Aug 2008, 11:13 by GeoW
Very Gentle Rinses
But the salt water rinses must be very gentle to
avoid washing the clot out of the socket ( dry
socket ). Also very hot.

GeoW


Posted on 26 Aug 2008, 15:19 by capoverde
Best pain killer.
Don't know if you can find this easily, but it's the very best painkiller (for nerve pain, as in this case) and has absolutely no negative side effects, as all commercial drugs have:
"Hypericum Perforatum". It's a natural remedy.

Some drops of mother tincture over the aching spots, plus two or three granules every hour or so in a low-dilution (9 to 20 CH) homoepathic preparation, will have unbelievable results: I can testify this personally - and always keep some in the first-aid drawer.

I learned about this remedy from a tiny first-aid manual written by a British war-time doctor (Dr. D. Shepherd): it was given to the wounded troops, who reportedly went back joking at the infirmary, but had been paralyzed by pain till some minutes after taking it.

It is also an extremely powerful anti-infective, and could altogether avoid the need for antibiotics; its only drawback (from the industry's viewpoint) is that it can't be patented. That's why nobody knows about it...

Best wishes!

capoverde


Posted on 28 Aug 2008, 16:20 by WhoDo
Watch that Panadeine Forte
I second the warning over Panadeine Forte. It gave me my first anaphylactic reaction. I now know I'm allergic to Codeine. Perenjori would NOT be a good place to be if you had such a reaction, too.

As a long-term suffer of severe arthritis (every single joint, believe it or not) I can tell you that you have being pain free to look forward to. I hope it comes sooner rather than later for you, mate.

Cheers